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What is RIBA in Construction?

9th Dec, 2020

RIBA is an industry-standard planning method that details each step of the process in a building, construction or design project.

RIBA is an industry-standard planning method that details each step of the process in a building, construction or design project. RIBA stands for the Royal Institute of British Architects, the global professional membership body for architects in the UK and around the world who publish the RIBA Plan of work (2013).

RIBA’s Role in Construction

Through the RIBA Plan of Work, the Institute helps architects to organise the process of the briefing, design, construction, maintenance, operation and use of building projects. The Plan of Work document lists all the tasks and outputs required at key stages of the project. It is the most commonly used construction project document in the UK and has become a definitive model for the construction process.

The Stages of the RIBA Plan of Work (2020)

There are 8 stages in the RIBA Plan of Work, numbered from 0 to 7.

0: Strategic Definition

During Stage 0, the project must be strategically appraised and defined, so that a detailed brief can be drafted. This is done to ensure that the client’s business case has been properly considered and addressed.

1: Preparation and Briefing

Stage 1 involves developing the project brief and conducting any necessary feasibility studies. Factors like site information, spatial requirements, budget restrictions, risk analysis and project outcomes must all be considered.

2: Concept Design

The initial concept design for the building will now be produced in line with the project brief. At Stage 2, the team will also develop several key project strategies, like security and sustainability.

3: Spatial Coordination

The concept design will be further developed, and the architectural, building services and structural engineering designs are coordinated and checked by the lead designer.

4: Technical Design

Stage 4 involves refining the architectural, building services and structural engineering designs in greater detail. Technical designs will be developed. Designs by any specialist subcontractors will be completed.

5: Manufacturing & Construction

This stage is when the actual process of building starts. This includes manufacturing building systems and erecting any components of the building that have been made off-site. During Stage 5, the designer should also carry out site inspections and compile quality reports.

6: Handover and Close Out

This phase focuses on the successful handover of the completed building, in line with the project programme and also includes completing initial aftercare tasks.

7: In Use

This involves a post-occupancy evaluation of the building to determine the project’s performance. It is also when facilities and asset management is implemented.